What we can all learn about editing our lives from Fight Club

January 8, 2017

Man, I see in fight club the strongest and smartest men who’ve ever lived. I see all this potential, and I see squandering. God damn it, an entire generation pumping gas, waiting tables; slaves with white collars. Advertising has us chasing cars and clothes, working jobs we hate so we can buy shit we don’t need. We’re the middle children of history, man. No purpose or place. We have no Great War. No Great Depression. Our Great War’s a spiritual war… our Great Depression is our lives. We’ve all been raised on television to believe that one day we’d all be millionaires, and movie gods, and rock stars. But we won’t. And we’re slowly learning that fact. And we’re very, very pissed off.” Tyler Durdan

 

Did we learn nothing from Tyler Durdan (Brad Pitt) on the turn of the century? It’s been over 16 years and we still don’t seem to have nailed even the most simple of concepts – a lot of us are working in jobs we hate to buy stuff we don’t need…

 

“You’re not your job. You’re not how much money you have in the bank. You’re not the car you drive. You’re not the contents of your wallet…” Tyler Durdan

 

Netflix has brought back a classic to our screens. I’ve watched Fight Club so many times before but never really listened to it, I blame Brad Pitt for this.

 

I’m not suggesting you burn your home, live in a squat and start fighting people underground. Instead take a look at what you have, what you honestly need and therefore the space, time and money you could free up if you were to sell your things/ donate to charity.

 

If you fancy a consensual round of fisty cuffs after that, go for it.

Fight Club Ikea

“Look, nobody takes this more seriously than me. That condo was my life, okay? I loved every stick of furniture in that place. That was not just a bunch of stuff that got destroyed, it was ME!”

 

If that sort of desperate plea  of association with your home and it’s contents rings true, you may need to re-address your priorities.

A common misconception about our things is that they show off who we are, truly. This is of course truly untrue.

Tyler only needed a lady’s dressing gown and a few pots and pans to make soap. Stylish and clean.

 

“It’s only after we’ve lost everything that we’re free to do anything.” Tyler Durdan

All quotes here: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0137523/quotes

You’re welcome.

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